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Structuring the Five-Paragraph Essay   Tags: en109, essays, five-paragraph essay, writing  

A handy guide created by the Bronx Campus Writing Resource Center
Last Updated: Mar 24, 2014 URL: http://monroecollege.libguides.com/5ParagraphEssay Print Guide RSS Updates

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"Five-Paragraph Essays"

This approach to writing an essay may seem formulaic or restrictive.  However, if you are justing getting started writing academic papers or are out of practice, this technique will give you a good start!

 

Books to Help You

Cover Art
Cengage Advantage Books: the Pocket Wadsworth Handbook - Laurie G. Kirszner; Stephen R. Mandell
Call Number: PE 1408 .K6755 2010
ISBN: 9780495912958
Publication Date: 2011-01-01

Structuring the Five-Paragraph Essay

I. INTRODUCTION

A. Begins with a sentence that captures the reader’s attention

1) You may want to use an interesting example, a surprising statistic, or a challenging question.

B. Gives background information on the topic.

C. Includes the THESIS STATEMENT which:

1) States the main ideas of the essay and includes:

a. Topic

b. Viewpoint (what you plan to say about the topic)

2) Is more general than supporting data

3) May mention the main point of each of the body paragraphs

II. BODY PARAGRAPH #1

A. Begins with a topic sentence that:

1) States the main point of the paragraph

2) Relates to the THESIS STATEMENT

B. After the topic sentence, you need to fill the paragraph with well-organized details, facts, and examples.

C. Paragraph may end with a transition.

III. BODY PARAGRAPH #2

A. Begins with a topic sentence that:

1) States the main point of the paragraph

2) Relates to the THESIS STATEMENT

B. After the topic sentence, you need to fill the paragraph with well-organized details, facts, and examples.

C. Paragraph may end with a transition.

IV. BODY PARAGRPH #3

A. Begins with a topic sentence that:

3) States the main point of the paragraph

4) Relates to the THESIS STATEMENT

B. After the topic sentence, you need to fill the paragraph with well-organized details, facts, and examples.

C. Paragraph may end with a transition.

V. CONCLUSION

A. Echoes the THESIS STATEMENT but does not repeat it.

B. Poses a question for the future, suggests some action to be taken, or warns of a consequence.

C. Includes a detail or example from the INTRODUCTION to “tie up” the essay.

D. Ends with a strong image – or a humorous or surprising statement.

About this Guide:

This guide is based on a handout created by the Bronx Campus Writing Resource Center.  Visit the WRC for additional help.

Choosing or Narrowing Your Topc

Ohio State University Library put together this very helpful PowerPoint presentation on how to choose and narrow a topic for your paper:

http://liblearn.osu.edu/courses/english110/old%20stuff/narrow_topic.ppt

 

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